Ki Chon

Ki Chon

Ki H. Chon received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Connecticut, Storrs; the M.S. degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Iowa, Iowa City; and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering and the Ph.D. degree in biomedical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He spent three years as an NIH Post-Doctoral fellow at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Science and Technology. He is currently the John and Donna Krenicki Endowed Chair Professor and Head of Biomedical Engineering at University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT.

He has published more than 114 peer-reviewed journal articles to date and has 6 U.S. patents granted. His patent on real-time detection of atrial fibrillation algorithm has been licensed to a Holter company and the Holter is currently on the market.

He was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering from 2007-2013. He has chaired many international conferences including his role as the Program Co-Chair for the IEEE EMBS conference in NYC in 2006, and as the Conference Chair for the 6th International Workshop on Biosignal Interpretation in New Haven, CT in 2009. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering and of the International Academy of Medical and Biological Engineering.


Contributions

  • Assessment of Carbon/Salt/Adhesive Electrodes for Surface Electromyography Measurements
    Assessment of Carbon/Salt/Adhesive Electrodes for Surface Electromyography Measurements

    We developed and tested new EMG electrodes that do not require hydrogel. The electrode is composed of carbon/salt/adhesive (CSA). We compared the performance of CSA to the standard Ag/AgCl electrodes subjected to various muscle contractions and relaxation movements. We found no significant differences in the signals’ amplitude, activation times and dynamics between two media during all muscle movements. Moreover, the CSA electrodes were found to be more resistant to noise and motion artifact contamination, and with lower spectral distortion than Ag/AgCl electrodes. CSA electrodes are potentially a suitable surrogate for Ag/AgCl electrodes for EMG with the added benefits of an infinite shelf-life and potentially lower cost.

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