A Community-based IoT Personalized Wireless Healthcare Solution Trial

May 14, 2018

Philip A. CatherwoodDavid N. SteeleMichael LittleStephen McCombJames McLaughlin

Part of the Special Issue on Advanced Internet of Things in Personalized Healthcare Systems: Validation, Analysis and Utilization

Early Access Note:
Early Access articles are new content made available in advance of the final electronic or print versions and result from IEEE’s Preprint or Rapid Post processes. Preprint articles are peer-reviewed but not fully edited. Rapid Post articles are peer-reviewed and edited but not paginated. Both these types of Early Access articles are fully citable from the moment they appear in IEEE Xplore.

Abstract

Bio-fluid sample tester system with LoRa radio

This paper presents an advanced Internet of Things point-of-care bio-fluid analyzer; a LoRa/Bluetooth-enabled electronic reader for biomedical strip-based diagnostics system for personalized monitoring. We undertake test simulations (technology trial without patient subjects) to demonstrate potential of long-range analysis, using a disposable test ‘key’ and companion Android app to form a diagnostic platform suitable for remote point-of-care screening for urinary tract infection. The 868 MHz LoRaWAN-enabled personalized monitor demonstrated sound potential with UTI test results being correctly diagnosed and transmitted to a remote secure cloud server in every case. Tests ranged over distances of 1.1-6.0 Km with radio path losses from 119-141 dB. All tests conducted were correctly and robustly received at the base station and relayed to the secure server for inspection. The UTI test strips were visually inspected for correct diagnosis based on color change and verified as 100% accurate. Results from testing across a number of regions indicate that such an Internet of Things medical solution is a robust and simple way to deliver next generation community-based smart diagnostics and disease management to best benefit patients and clinical staff alike. This significant step can be applied to any type of home or region, particularly those lacking suitable mobile signals, broadband connections, or even landlines. It brings subscription-free long-range bio-telemetry to healthcare providers and offers savings on regular clinician home visits or frequent clinic visits by the chronically ill. This work highlights practical hurdles in establishing an Internet of Medical Things network, assisting informed deployment of similar future systems.

READ FULL ARTICLE ON IEEE XPLORE

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