A Method to Standardize Quantification of Left Atrial Scar From Delayed-Enhancement MR Images

April 7, 2014
Figure shows a heat map of the left atrium, generated from the algorithm, showing likely areas of scar. Purple stylized dots represent potential sites of ablation based on the scar distribution.

Figure shows a heat map of the left atrium, generated from the algorithm, showing likely areas of scar. Purple stylized dots represent potential sites of ablation based on the scar distribution.

Standardization of quantification for left-atrial scar will allow the selection of patients who are predicted to respond well to ablation procedures for cardiac arrhythmias. This could improve the success rate of such procedures and reduce recurrence of arrhythmias. An algorithm to standardize quantification is proposed.

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Authors

See complete bios of the authors in the full version of this article.

R KarimR Karim
Mr. Karim has been a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow with the King’s College London Medical Engineering Centre. since 2010. His current research interests include myocardial scar classication from MR, image-guided robotics, and left atrial surface parameterization.

A ArujunaA Arujuna
Mr. Arujuna was a Clinical Research Fellow with the Department of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King’s College London until 2012. He recieved an M.D. from the King’s College in 2013. His research interests include image-guided cardiovascular interventions, cardiac electromechanical modeling, advanced pacing, and advanced imaging.

R J HousdenR J Housden
Dr. Housden is currently a Post-Doctoral Researcher with the Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King’s College London, involved primarily in image guidance systems for minimally invasive cardiac catheterization. His research interests include ultrasound imaging, image processing, and surgical guidance systems.

H CliffeH Cliffe
Ms. Cliffe is in her penultimate year of reading medicine at King’s College, London, having received a Distinction for Pre-clinical Sciences. She is currently studying for a Diploma in Conict and Catastrophe Medicine at the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London, and is a Medical Cadet, sponsored through her studies by the Royal Air Force.

M O'NeillM O’Neill
Dr. O’Neill is a Clinical Lead of the King’s Health Partners Clinical Academic Group, Departmental Lead for Arrhythmias in Adult Congenital Heart Disease, and the Divisional Research Lead for electrophysiology. His primary research interests are the development and use of advanced signal processing and imaging technologies to improve arrhythmia characterization and treatment in patients with heart rhythm disturbances.

D RueckertD Rueckert
Dr. Rueckert is a Professor of Visual Information Processing and heads the Biomedical Image Analysis Group with the Department of Computing, Imperial College London. He is also an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, an Editorial Board Member of Medical Image Analysis, Image and Vision Computing, and a Referee for a number of international medical imaging journals and conferences.

R RazaviR Razavi
Dr. Razavi is the Director of the KCL Centre for Excellence in Medical Engineering funded by the Welcome Trust and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. His current research interests include cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and MR-guided cardiac catheterization.

T SchaeffterT Schaeffter
Dr. Scaeffter’s current research interests include the investigation of new acquisition and reconstruction techniques for cardiovascular and quantitative MRI. In particular, he is involved in new techniques for MR-guided electrophysiology procedures and the quantitative assessment of ablation procedures. He has also pioneered a technique for Botulinum toxin injection for the treatment of overactive bladders.

K RhodeK Rhode
Dr. Rhode is a Senior Lecturer with the King’s College London. His research interests include image-guided cardiovascular interventions, cardiac electromechanical modeling, computer simulation of minimally invasive procedures, and medical robotics. He specializes in translation of novel technologies into the clinical environment via collaborative research programs with leading clinical and industrial partners.

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