Instructions for Authors

Author Instructions for Manuscript Preparation

January 2018
JTEHM publishes translational research papers and findings in all stages of technology translation to healthcare and clinical applications emphasizing on the expected or demonstrated impact in patient care and medical practice. JTEHM welcomes submission of all types of translational research in the categories indicated below.

1. Early Translational Research Papers

These papers are usually in the early translation (T1) process. Download the Early Translational Research Papers template.

Early translational research papers should follow the following format and section titles:

Abstract: Limited to 250 words; should summarize:

  • Objective
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusion
  • Clinical Impact

Index Terms: Keywords should be included to define the scope of the paper.

Disclosures: In addition, any standards or regulatory protocols (e.g., human subjects, animals, etc.) used in the study must be summarized in the Methods and Procedures section (including, if human or animal subjects were used, a statement that the research was approved by an ethics committee or institutional review board).

The following major sections can be included in the paper:

  1. Introduction
  2. Background and Approach
  3. Methods and Procedures
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Conclusion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References
  9. Appendix (Optional)

2. Clinical Trial Papers

These papers include T2 and T3 clinical and healthcare translation for assessing a technology’s efficacy and possible impact on patient care. These papers may include controlled or randomized trails. Reports of research involving human subjects must include detailed information about the research protocol, including the inclusion and exclusion criteria, data collection and analysis, and a statement on ethics committee/IRB approval and informed consent of subjects. Outcome analysis on the wider translation and use of the technology or treatment in healthcare should be included in the Clinical Impact section. Download the Clinical Trial Papers template.

The clinical trial papers should follow the following format and section titles:

Abstract: Limited to 250 words; should summarize:

  • Objective
  • Human Subjects Protocol
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusion
  • Clinical Impact

Index Terms: Keywords should be included to define the scope of the paper.

Disclosures: For human or animal studies, a statement in the Methods section that the research was approved by an ethics committee or institutional review board (including protocol number if possible).

The following major sections can be included in the paper:

  1. Introduction
  2. Study Design and Human Subject Protocol
    1. Number of Subjects and Recruitment
    2. Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria
    3. Confidentiality and Safety Protocols
  3. Methods and Procedures
    1. Data Collection
    2. Data Analysis
  4. Results and Clinical Outcome Analysis
  5. Conclusion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References
  8. Appendix (Optional)

For clinical trials based papers, authors are strongly recommended to follow the section format description and checklist posted on CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) website.

3. Challenge Papers

Challenge papers may include technology translation issues in the T4 phase, case studies, unmet clinical needs, and challenges in technology translation in community from the perspective(s) of stakeholder groups, including healthcare providers, industry, regulatory agencies and payors. Some results with data to support challenges and associated discussion, even if it is early phase, should be included. Download the Challenge Paper template.

The challenge or advanced translational research papers should follow the following format and section titles:

Abstract: Limited to 250 words; should summarize:

  • Challenge or Objective
  • Unmet Clinical Need for Technology Translation
  • Background (State-of-the-Art)
  • Methods, Protocols and Procedures
  • Results (even if early phase)
  • Future Directions and Potential Clinical Impact

Index Terms: Keywords should be included to define the scope of the paper.

Disclosures: For human or animal studies, a statement in the Methods section that the research was approved by an ethics committee or institutional review board (including protocol number if possible).

The following major sections can be included in the paper:

  1. Introduction
  2. Challenge
  3. Clinical Need (for Technology Translation)
  4. Background: State-of-the-Art
  5. Methods and Procedures
  6. Results
  7. Future Directions
  8. Potential Clinical Impact
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. References
  11. Appendix (Optional)

3. Translational Research Review Papers

Translational research review papers review current approaches in technology translation. The reviews may cover technological approaches, available technologies, clinical trials, and technology translation issues, if possible with case studies and perspective(s) from stakeholder groups, including healthcare providers, industry, regulatory agencies, or payors. Download the Translational Research Review Papers template.

The reviews in translational research papers should follow the following format and section titles:

Abstract: Limited to 250 words; should summarize:

  • Objective
  • Clinical Need (for Technology Translation)
  • Background
  • State-of-the-Art (Clinical/Technology Approaches)
  • Comparative Assessment
  • Future Directions and Potential Clinical Impact

Index Terms: Keywords should be included to define the scope of the paper.

Disclosures: For human or animal studies, a statement in the Methods section that the research was approved by an ethics committee or institutional review board (including protocol number if possible).

The following major sections can be included in the paper:

  1. Introduction
  2. Clinical Need (for Technology Translation)
  3. Background
  4. State-of-the-Art Clinical/Technology Approaches
  5. Review: Methods and Procedures
  6. Review: Comparative Assessment and Discussion
  7. Future Directions
  8. Potential Clinical Impact
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. References
  11. Appendix (Optional)

Communications

Short papers of 3 pages maximum are published on the JTEHM website as communications. Communications are reviewed by the editorial board or through peer-review at the Editor’s discretion following an expedited review process. Communications are published with an editorial commentary and may be accompanied by additional material such as video, databases and executable codes of any models as provided by authors. Communications should include new results on novel technologies in early translational development phase, early clinical implementation and validation, or discussion on emerging challenges and unmet needs. For a limited time, communications will be published on the JTEHM website without any open-access publication fee. Download the Communication template.

Communications as short papers should follow the following format.

Abstract: Limited to 150 words; should summarize:

  • Objective
  • Results
  • Discussion (or Preliminary Assessment)
  • Methods

Index Terms: Keywords should be included to define the scope of the paper.

Disclosures: In addition, any standards or regulatory protocols (e.g., human subjects, animals, etc.) used in the study must be summarized.

The following major sections can be included in the paper:

  1. Introduction and Clinical Need (for Technology Translation)
  2. Results
  3. Discussion
  4. Methods
  5. Future Directions and Potential Clinical Impact
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References

Letter to the Editor

A Letter to the Editor is a brief report or commentary that is within the journal’s scope and of particular interest to the community, but not suitable as a standard research article. It can represent the opinion of an individual or a small group of individuals/stakeholders. Letters must be limited to 500 words and will be published on the JTEHM website without any open-access publication fee.

Letters to the Editor may be edited for clarity or length and may be subject to peer review at the Editors’ discretion. To contribute, please contact the Editors.

Appendix: Supplemental Material

JTEHM strongly encourages authors to submit appendix material such as videos, data files, models and programs, detailed figures and any additional information. This information will be posted on the JTEHM website with links to the published paper in IEEE Xplore.

NIH’s Four Stages of Clinical Translation

As adopted by the National Institutes of Health and other institutions, technology translation from laboratory research to healthcare practice includes four stages of translation:

  1. Early/Pre-Clinical Research (T1 Translation): Primarily focused on basic and applied research and development with preliminary assessment involving human subjects or animals to demonstrate the potential clinical application and efficacy to address unmet clinical and/or healthcare needs. These studies can determine what actually may work (e.g., clinical efficacy research) to find new potential solutions to clinical and healthcare unmet needs. It may involve early clinical trials with limited scope.
  2. Clinical Research (T2 Translation): Focused on systematic translation to patients under clinical or healthcare protocols involving controlled studies and randomized clinical trials. It translates results from early clinical studies to controlled observation studies and full clinical trials for patient care and health decision making. The clinical trials with statistical data analysis may answer the question, “Will the new protocol, method or treatment tested in a small number of patients in the medical center work in a large number of patients?”
  3. Clinical Implementation (T3 Translation): Focused on actual translation to clinical practice involving application protocols with required regulations, standards, monitoring and evaluation of impact on patient care on a regular or daily basis. It builds on the clinical efficacy work conducted in the second phase of the translation process (T2) into clinical practice. It is to address ‘how’ the new technology, protocol or treatment will be used for health care delivery so that treatments and interventions studied in T2 are reliable in all patient care settings and do improve health of patients overall. T3 Research relies on the distribution and implementation of the results found in T2 to demonstrate the wider use and implementation in healthcare.
  4. Public Health and Clinical Outcomes (T4 Translation): Focused on building on the results of third phase of the translation process (T3) to identify the best approach to reach clinicians and patients to help understanding and implementing the technology protocols, treatments and interventions to define outcomes, assessment matrices to demonstrate the overall impact in healthcare at large. Findings help guide scientists working to improve interventions or develop new ones.

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