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Development of Novel Non-Contact Electrodes for a Mobile Electrocardiogram Monitoring System

B-S Lin, National Chiao Tung University; W Chou, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Taiwan; H-Y Wang and Y-J Huang, National Chiao Tung University and J-S Pan, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences

Development of Novel Non-Contact Electrodes for a Mobile Electrocardiogram Monitoring System

Real-time monitoring of cardiac health is helpful for patients with cardiovascular disease. Many telemedicine systems based on ubiquitous computing and communication techniques have been proposed for monitoring the user’s electrocardiogram (ECG) anywhere and anytime. Usually, wet electrodes are used in these telemedicine systems. However, wet electrodes require conduction gels and skin preparation that can be inconvenient and uncomfortable for users. In order to overcome this issue, a new non-contact electrode circuit was proposed and applied in developing a mobile electrocardiogram monitoring system. The proposed non-contact electrode can measure bio-potentials across thin clothing, allowing it to be embedded in a user’s normal clothing to monitor ECG in daily life. We attempted to simplify the design of these non-contact electrodes to reduce power consumption while continuing to provide good signal quality. The electrical specifications and the performance of monitoring arrhythmia in clinical settings were also validated to investigate the reliability of the proposed design. Experimental results show that the proposed non-contact electrode provides good signal quality for measuring ECG across thin clothes.

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Authors

See complete bios of the authors in the full version of this article.

Bor-Shyh LinB-S Lin
Dr. Lin is an Assistant Professor with the Institute of Imaging and Biomedical Photonics, National Chiao Tung University. His current research interests include biomedical circuits and systems, biomedical signal processing, and biosensors.

Willy ChouW Chou
Mr. Chou is currently an Assistant Professor with the Department of Leisure Management, Cha Nan Pharmacy & Science University, Taiwan. He is the Director of the Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Department, the Chief of the Human Resource Department, and Secretary of Medical Affair of Chimei Medical Center, Chimei, Taiwan. 

Hsing-Yu WangH-Y Wang
Mr. Wang has a M.S. degree in electrical engineering from National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. His current research interests include biomedical circuits and systems and biosensors.

Yan-Jun HuangY-J Huang
Mr. Huang is currently pursuing his Master’s degree with the Institute of Imaging and Biomedical Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan. His current research interests include biomedical circuits and systems and biosensors.

Jeng-Shyang PanJ-S Pan
Dr. Pan is is a fellow of the IET, UK, and Vice Chair (Industrial) of the IEEE Tainan Section and the Tainan Chapter Chair of the IEEE Signal Processing Society. He is currently a Professor with the Department of Electronic Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

Editorial Comments

This research paper discusses the design and development of a non-contact electrode system for wireless monitoring of ECG along with some performance measures. Such non-contact electrodes with wireless monitoring are helpful in telemedicine by providing continuous ECG data. Since these can be embedded in the normal clothing, patients will be comfortable with its use. This technology may someday replace the Holter monitoring system.

JTEHM 2013Issue

This article appeared in the 2013 issue of IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine.
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